How Firm a Foundation (folklore)

why did easter egg hunts begin?

Online source: How Firm a Foundation (folklore) sheet music

The Decorated Easter EggThe egg is nature’s perfect package. It has, during the span of history, represented mystery, magic, medicine, food and omen. It is the universal symbol of Easter celebrations throughout the world and has been dyed, painted, adorned and embellished in the celebration of its special symbolism.Before the egg became closely entwined with the Christian Easter, it was honored during many rite-of-Spring festivals. The Romans, Gauls, Chinese, Egyptians and Persians all cherished the egg as a symbol of the universe. From ancient times eggs were dyed, exchanged and shown reverence.In Pagan times the egg represented the rebirth of the earth. The long, hard winter was over; the earth burst forth and was reborn just as the egg miraculously burst forth with life. The egg, therefore, was believed to have special powers. It was buried under the foundations of buildings to ward off evil; pregnant young Roman women carried an egg on their persons to foretell the sex of their unborn children; French brides stepped upon an egg before crossing the threshold of their new homes.With the advent of Chrisianity the symbolism of the egg changed to represent, not nature’s rebirth, but the rebirth of man. Christians embraced the egg symbol and likened it to the tomb from which Christ rose.Old Polish legends blended folklore and Christian beliefs and firmly attached the egg to the Easter celebration. One legend concerns the Virgin Mary. It tells of the time Mary gave eggs to the soldiers at the cross. She entreated them to be less cruel and she wept. The tears of Mary fell upon the eggs, spotting them with dots of brilliant color.Another Polish legend tells of when Mary Magdalen went to the sepulchre to anoint the body of Jesus. She had with her a basket of eggs to serve as a repast. When she arrived at the sepulchre and uncovered the eggs, lo, the pure white shells had miraculously taken on a rainbow of colors.Decorating and coloring eggs for Easter was the custom in England during the middle ages. The household accounts of Edward I, for the year 1290, recorded an expenditure of eighteen pence for four hundred and fifty eggs to be gold-leafed and colored for Easter gifts.The most famous decorated Easter eggs were those made by the well-known goldsmith, Peter Carl Faberge. In 1883 the Russian Czar, Alexander, commissioned Faberge to make a special Easter gift for his wife, the Empress Marie.The first Faberge egg was an egg within an egg. It had an outside shell of platinum and enameled white which opened to reveal a smaller gold egg. The smaller egg, in turn, opened to display a golden chicken and a jeweled replica of the Imperial crown.This special Faberge egg so delighted the Czarina that the Czar promptly ordered the Faberge firm to design further eggs to be delivered every Easter. In later years Nicholas II, Alexander’s son, continued the custom. Fifty-seven eggs were made in all.Ornamental egg designers believe in the symbolism of the egg and celebrate the egg by decorating it with superb artistry. Some use flowers and leaves from greeting cards, tiny cherubs, jewels and elegant fabrics, braids and trims, to adorn the eggs. They are separated, delicately hinged and glued with epoxy and transparent cement, then when completed, they are covered with a glossy resin finish. Although the omens and the mystery of the egg have disappeared today, the symbolism remains, and artists continue in the old world tradition of adorning eggs.

Is easter eggs religious? Ive got an re assigment due in tomorow! Ive been looking up everywhere but i just cant find the answer.does anyone know if easter eggs are religious if so why? if not why? Thanks for ur tym
yes but they come from the pagan religion, also the rabbit and fish. look up ostara not sure on the spelling

The egg is nature’s perfect package. It has, during the span of history, represented mystery, magic, medicine, food and omen. It is the universal symbol of Easter celebrations throughout the world and has been dyed, painted, adorned and embellished in the celebration of its special symbolism.Before the egg became closely entwined with the Christian Easter, it was honored during many rite-of-Spring festivals. The Romans, Gauls, Chinese, Egyptians and Persians all cherished the egg as a symbol of the universe. From ancient times eggs were dyed, exchanged and shown reverence.In Pagan times the egg represented the rebirth of the earth. The long, hard winter was over; the earth burst forth and was reborn just as the egg miraculously burst forth with life. The egg, therefore, was believed to have special powers. It was buried under the foundations of buildings to ward off evil; pregnant young Roman women carried an egg on their persons to foretell the sex of their unborn children; French brides stepped upon an egg before crossing the threshold of their new homes.With the advent of Chrisianity the symbolism of the egg changed to represent, not nature’s rebirth, but the rebirth of man. Christians embraced the egg symbol and likened it to the tomb from which Christ rose.Old Polish legends blended folklore and Christian beliefs and firmly attached the egg to the Easter celebration. One legend concerns the Virgin Mary. It tells of the time Mary gave eggs to the soldiers at the cross. She entreated them to be less cruel and she wept. The tears of Mary fell upon the eggs, spotting them with dots of brilliant color.Another Polish legend tells of when Mary Magdalen went to the sepulchre to anoint the body of Jesus. She had with her a basket of eggs to serve as a repast. When she arrived at the sepulchre and uncovered the eggs, lo, the pure white shells had miraculously taken on a rainbow of colors.Decorating and coloring eggs for Easter was the custom in England during the middle ages. The household accounts of Edward I, for the year 1290, recorded an expenditure of eighteen pence for four hundred and fifty eggs to be gold-leafed and colored for Easter gifts.The most famous decorated Easter eggs were those made by the well-known goldsmith, Peter Carl Faberge. In 1883 the Russian Czar, Alexander, commissioned Faberge to make a special Easter gift for his wife, the Empress Marie.The first Faberge egg was an egg within an egg. It had an outside shell of platinum and enameled white which opened to reveal a smaller gold egg. The smaller egg, in turn, opened to display a golden chicken and a jeweled replica of the Imperial crown.This special Faberge egg so delighted the Czarina that the Czar promptly ordered the Faberge firm to design further eggs to be delivered every Easter. In later years Nicholas II, Alexander’s son, continued the custom. Fifty-seven eggs were made in all.Ornamental egg designers believe in the symbolism of the egg and celebrate the egg by decorating it with superb artistry. Some use flowers and leaves from greeting cards, tiny cherubs, jewels and elegant fabrics, braids and trims, to adorn the eggs. They are separated, delicately hinged and glued with epoxy and transparent cement, then when completed, they are covered with a glossy resin finish. Although the omens and the mystery of the egg have disappeared today, the symbolism remains, and artists continue in the old world tradition of adorning eggs.

Rabbits and eggs are both symbols of the fertility goddess Eostre/Ishtar/Ostara. Her symbol is also the moon, in which some cultures see a rabbit instead of a face. Eggs also symbolize the moon and are the ultimate symbol of creation and new life. The basket is a symbol of the womb in which this new life is carried.The feast day is pagan and was widely celebrated way before the time of Jesus. Like pretty much all holidays, it was adopted by Christians to help get more converts. However, since the point is to celebrate new life and the hope of continuance, Christian symbols of a Resurrection day and the old pagan symbols mean the same thing. Just like Christmas, we are all celebrating the same thing, just using different symbols.Frankly I think it’s kind of sad, the mental contortions Christians go to, to convince themselves eggs are a Christian symbol rather than pagan. I mean, if that were true, they’d be a religious symbol all year round, and not just at Easter.They were pagan first, and will never be associated with Christianity.

The Easter egg is a custom which has grown up around Easter. It is not directly religious but indirectly. Christians used to give up eggs (and meat) for Lent – the period before Easter. Some still give up small pleasures – sweets or alcohol. That is why pancakes, made with eggs, are traditionally eaten on Shrove Tuesday (Mardi Gras) – the day before the start of Lent.Hence, in some countries, a custom developed of giving people an egg as a present for Easter – a symbol of the end of the Lenten fast and the beginning of the Easter feast. They were sometimes dyed or decorated in various ways, Chocolate eggs are a later 19th century innovation.Stories about pagan goddesses were made up in the 18th and 19th centuries. There is no historical record of any goddess associated with Easter, bunnies and/or eggs.

Check out this site for a brief history on easter!apartments.typepad.com/my_pad/easter/index.htmlHope this helps! 🙂

The Eastern Christians venerate Mary Magdalene as “Apostle to the Apostles,” and credit her with using red-dyed eggs as an evangelism aid.So they’re not as religious as crosses or bibles, but can be used in a religious context.

No technically. Easter is about Jesus rising from the grave. it has abosolutly nothing to do with that. Easter eggs made easter a big deal for all people so it wasnt only a Christian holiday. Just like christmas became gifts and all so everyone celebrates christmas. No. simply.

The pagans called Easter , The Rebirth , and decorated with everything that is found in Springtime , Young bunnies and chicks are born in Spring . The egg represents young life , Spring flowers , etc are all Pagan .The church took over the holiday and continued the rebirth idea . They claimed Jesus came back to life ( rebirth ) at that time . I see no way that the church can claim the egg has some religious significance .

Not at all. Easter has nothing to do with eggs or bunnies. It was to commemorate the time when Jesus rose from the dead.Good luck with your project.

Not really.Rabbits and eggs are pagan fertility symbols of extreme antiquity.Birds lay eggs and rabbits give birth to large litters in the early spring these became symbols of the rising fertility of the earth during the spring season.Since Easter also occurs in the early spring, people brought the beloved pagan symbols into the Christian celebration of Easter.These pagan symbols have become part of the Christian tradition. They do not take anything away from the Resurrection of Jesus Christ and they add to the celebration.Christianity has frequently absorbed the positive and neutral symbols of pagan religions while leaving the negative symbols behind, similar to Christmas trees and Halloween costumes.With love in Christ.

No.Easter don’t have nothing to do with Jesus Christ; it deals with the goddess Ishtar or better known for these names: Ostara, Estera, Oestre, Eastre. family.webshots.com/photo/2682053500049373547xErSEqEASTER NOT FOUND IN THE BIBLE”The English word ‘Easter’ came from the Anglo-Saxon Eastre or Estera, a Teutonic goddess to whom sacrifice was offered in April, so the name was transferred to the Pashal Feast. The word does not properly occur in Scripture although the AV (King James Translation) has it in ACTS 12:4 where it stands for ‘Passover’ as it is rightly rendered in RV (Revised Version). There is no trace of Easter celebration in the New Testament.” (INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BIBLE ENCYCLOPEDIA VOL.2, P.889). The word ‘Easter’ has confused some but the word in the original form is “Pascha” meaning “Passover”. It occurs 29 times in the New Testament & everytime it’s translated Passover except in Acts 12:4. If you read carefully (ACTS 12:1-4); it says that Herod killed James and was trying to kill Peter in an effort to “vex the church”(Please the Jews). Then in VERSE 3 “were the days of unleavened bread”; see LEV.23. He put him in prison intending to try him “after Easter” (KJV). Now if Herod was trying to “please the Jews” & “vex the church” Why would he have delayed the trial until after ‘Easter?'” If this was a “Christian holy day”, especially one in honoring Christ’s resurrection, he would surely not be pleasing the Jews, Wouldn’t it be more pleasing to the Jews to vex the church by killing one of it’s Apostles on it’s own “holy-day,” would it not?ORIGIN OF EASTER: WHERE DID IT COME FROM?Easter was never observed by the Apostles of Christ or Christ’s Religion. “The name ‘Easter’ comes to us from the mythlogical writings of the Ancient Teucrians (who lived 1200BC along the southern coast of Palestine) where it’s known as ‘Ostern'” BY GROVER STEVENS. “The name ‘Easter’ is merely the slightly changed English spelling of the name of the ancient Assyrian and Babylonian idol goddess, Ishtar (pronounced eesh-tar).” WEBSTER’S DICTIONARY says “Easter is from the pre-historic name of a pagan spring festival.” THE OXFORD DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH ETYMOLOGY says, “Easter is derived from the name of goddess whose feast was celebrated at the vernal equinox.” THE SCHOLARY NEW SCHAFF-HERZOG RELIGIOUS ENCYCLOPEDIA says, “This goddess is also widely known as Astarte.The cult originated in Babylonia and spread to Assyria, Mesopotamia, Syria & Palestine, then through the Phoenicians to all of the Meditteranean peoples.Ishtar was in fact primarily and chiefly identified as Venus, the most beautiful of celestial objects & from the terrestrial side, the primarily motive of the worship of Ishtar was the impulse to deify sensuous and sensuality.” ALEXANDER HISLOP SAYS IN THE TWO BABYLONS (P.103), “Easter bears its Chaldean origin on its forehead. Easter is nothing else than Astarte, one of the titles of Beltis, the queen of heaven.”family.webshots.com/photo/2697509080049373547HwkuKimatrifocus.com/IMB04/spotlight.htmalbatrus.org/english/festivals/easter/is_easter_pagan.htmen.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ishtarlcg.org/search/search.php?query=easter&type=and&results=10&search=1tomorrowsworld.org/cgi-bin/tw/telecast/tw-telecast.cgi?category=Media1&item=1104435600The Easter Bunny and eggs deal with fertility of the goddess Ishtar. “Eggs, the obvious symbols of fertility and reproduction, were used in ancient fertility rites. They were painted with various magical symbols and then cast into fires or buried in the earth as offerings to the Goddess. In certain parts of the world, Spring Equinox eggs were painted yellow or gold (sacred solar colors) and used in rituals to honor the Sun God. Easter, like every other Christian religious holiday is rich with an abundance of Pagan overtones, customs and traditions such as Easter eggs and Easter bunny. Eggs, as previously discussed were ancient fertility symbols and offerings to the Goddess of the Pagans and Witches in both western and eastern cultures, including the Goddess Ostara, whose escort was a rabbit. “nobleknights.com/~eagle1/eostre1.htmEXODUS 20:3 = “Thou shalt not have other gods before me.” It tells us in verse 5 = “not to bow to them nor serve them”.(Pagan means no religious beliefs; in the 1984 New Concise Webster’s Dictionary–Pagan defined : “A heathen; one having no religious beliefs”)VERSES– DEUT.4:19,28-31; 11:26-28; 17:3 & GAL.4:8-10.cogwriter.com/easter.htm

About simonboli

Hi. I'm music arranger and composer. Mostly focus on classical genres. Also give music lessons.
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